Mustaches & Baseball



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Mustaches & Baseball
Americana at its finest.





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#52: George FosterCard: 1984 DonrussMoustache Type: Heavy Pencil with Mutton ChopsFact: An integral member of the “Big Red Machine,” George Foster won the NL MVP in 1977, belting 52 home runs and amassing 149 RBI — and just missed the Triple Crown after finishing fourth in batting average. When he retired in 1986 after five turbulent seasons with the Mets, his $2.8 million salary was the highest in baseball. One of the most dominant sluggers of his era, Foster grounded out to short in his only at-bat of an old-timers’ game in 1988.

#52: George Foster
Card: 1984 Donruss
Moustache Type: Heavy Pencil with Mutton Chops
Fact: An integral member of the “Big Red Machine,” George Foster won the NL MVP in 1977, belting 52 home runs and amassing 149 RBI — and just missed the Triple Crown after finishing fourth in batting average. When he retired in 1986 after five turbulent seasons with the Mets, his $2.8 million salary was the highest in baseball. One of the most dominant sluggers of his era, Foster grounded out to short in his only at-bat of an old-timers’ game in 1988.

07:14 am, by pwags1 note




#51: Jim LeylandCard: 1986 ToppsMustache Type: The MagnumFact: The 2013 season will mark an incredible 50th year in professional baseball for Jim Leyland, the 15th winningest coach in MLB history. In December 2012, the pride of Perrysburg High School donated $100,000 to help build a new baseball facility at his alma mater. The gift coincides with his 50-year high school reunion, where, according to Leyland, “Margaret Bayer looked fantastic.”

#51: Jim Leyland
Card: 1986 Topps
Mustache Type: The Magnum
Fact: The 2013 season will mark an incredible 50th year in professional baseball for Jim Leyland, the 15th winningest coach in MLB history. In December 2012, the pride of Perrysburg High School donated $100,000 to help build a new baseball facility at his alma mater. The gift coincides with his 50-year high school reunion, where, according to Leyland, “Margaret Bayer looked fantastic.”

04:57 pm, by pwags5 notes




#50: Johnnie LeMasterCard: 1981 FleerMustache Type: Just Plain DirtyFact: Though his first career hit was an inside-the-park home run, LeMaster’s legacy lies in his unequivocally bad stats – a .222 career average over 12 seasons – and the penchant for Giants fans to constantly boo during his plate appearances. The booing occurred so frequently that for one game in 1979 LeMaster took the field with “BOO” written across the back of his jersey. Unfortunately, in this moment of self-deprecation, the fans just booed louder.

#50: Johnnie LeMaster
Card: 1981 Fleer
Mustache Type: Just Plain Dirty
Fact: Though his first career hit was an inside-the-park home run, LeMaster’s legacy lies in his unequivocally bad stats – a .222 career average over 12 seasons – and the penchant for Giants fans to constantly boo during his plate appearances. The booing occurred so frequently that for one game in 1979 LeMaster took the field with “BOO” written across the back of his jersey. Unfortunately, in this moment of self-deprecation, the fans just booed louder.

03:12 pm, by pwags3 notes




#49: Bill LaskeyCard: 1983 FleerMustache Type: Small HorseshoeFact: In his rookie year of 1982, Bill Laskey led the Giants in Wins, ERA and innings pitched. Today, he works as an analyst for Comcast SportsNet Bay Area, and on August 6, 2012, he tweeted: “do you have your rally thong on I forgot mine ! So Vida and I changed chairs to change #sfgiants luck.” And, seriously, how cool of a name is Bill Laskey?

#49: Bill Laskey
Card: 1983 Fleer
Mustache Type: Small Horseshoe
Fact: In his rookie year of 1982, Bill Laskey led the Giants in Wins, ERA and innings pitched. Today, he works as an analyst for Comcast SportsNet Bay Area, and on August 6, 2012, he tweeted: “do you have your rally thong on I forgot mine ! So Vida and I changed chairs to change #sfgiants luck.” And, seriously, how cool of a name is Bill Laskey?

02:06 pm, by pwags2 notes




#48: Larry AndersenCard: 1988 ToppsMustache Type: WalrusFact: Author of such witticisms as “Why do people sing ‘Take Me Out to the Ball Game’ when they’re already there?” and “Why do you drive on the parkway and park in the driveway?”, Larry Andersen played 17 seasons in the majors. In 1990, he was involved in one of the most lopsided trades in baseball history – the Houston Astros dealt Andersen to the Boston Red Sox in exchange for minor league prospect Jeff Bagwell.

#48: Larry Andersen
Card: 1988 Topps
Mustache Type: Walrus
Fact: Author of such witticisms as “Why do people sing ‘Take Me Out to the Ball Game’ when they’re already there?” and “Why do you drive on the parkway and park in the driveway?”, Larry Andersen played 17 seasons in the majors. In 1990, he was involved in one of the most lopsided trades in baseball history – the Houston Astros dealt Andersen to the Boston Red Sox in exchange for minor league prospect Jeff Bagwell.

01:21 pm, by pwags4 notes


#47: Tom Selleck / Jack ElliotCard: 1992 Upper DeckMustache Type: The MagnumFact: After being traded from the New York Yankees to the Nagoya Chunichi Dragons, Jack Elliot could just not adust to the Japanese culture and style of baseball. Mired in his own self-loathing, he was soon suspended for alienating his teammates and committing numerous outbursts. Yet, after a heartfelt meeting with manager Uchiyama, Elliot swallowed his pride and apologized to his teammates. The Dragons – driven by sportsmanship, determination and Elliot’s contagious, unbridled enthusiasm – defied the odds and won the Central League Pennant. With his success and new outlook on life, Elliot secured an unspecified coaching position with the Detroit Tigers – a position he presumably still holds today.

#47: Tom Selleck / Jack Elliot
Card:
1992 Upper Deck
Mustache Type:
The Magnum
Fact: After being traded from the New York Yankees to the Nagoya Chunichi Dragons, Jack Elliot could just not adust to the Japanese culture and style of baseball. Mired in his own self-loathing, he was soon suspended for alienating his teammates and committing numerous outbursts. Yet, after a heartfelt meeting with manager Uchiyama, Elliot swallowed his pride and apologized to his teammates. The Dragons – driven by sportsmanship, determination and Elliot’s contagious, unbridled enthusiasm – defied the odds and won the Central League Pennant. With his success and new outlook on life, Elliot secured an unspecified coaching position with the Detroit Tigers – a position he presumably still holds today.

11:30 am, by pwags




#46: George BellCard: 1988 ToppsMustache Type: Heavy PencilFact: In 1987, Bell won the AL MVP with 47 home runs, 134 RBI and a .308 average, narrowly defeating Alan Trammell. On opening day the following season, he smashed three home runs, yet only finished the 1988 season with a meager 24 dingers. Soon after being traded from the Cubs to the White Sox in exchange for Sammy Sosa, Bell retired in 1993. Today, he is an avid golfer with a 2-handicap.

#46: George Bell
Card: 1988 Topps
Mustache Type: Heavy Pencil
Fact: In 1987, Bell won the AL MVP with 47 home runs, 134 RBI and a .308 average, narrowly defeating Alan Trammell. On opening day the following season, he smashed three home runs, yet only finished the 1988 season with a meager 24 dingers. Soon after being traded from the Cubs to the White Sox in exchange for Sammy Sosa, Bell retired in 1993. Today, he is an avid golfer with a 2-handicap.

12:35 pm, by pwags1 note

#45: Brian HarperCard: 90s era Upper DeckMustache Type: Full Major Fact: A career .295 hitter, Harper was notoriously difficult to strike out. During the 1990 and 1992 seasons with the Twins, he led the AL in at-bats per strikeout – with 17.7 AB and 22.8 AB per strikeout, respectively. And in 1991, Harper placed second on the team with a .311 average (behind only Kirby Puckett) for the World Series champions. 
#45: Brian Harper
Card:
90s era Upper Deck
Mustache Type:
Full Major 
Fact:
A career .295 hitter, Harper was notoriously difficult to strike out. During the 1990 and 1992 seasons with the Twins, he led the AL in at-bats per strikeout – with 17.7 AB and 22.8 AB per strikeout, respectively. And in 1991, Harper placed second on the team with a .311 average (behind only Kirby Puckett) for the World Series champions. 
01:12 pm, by pwags3 notes




#44: Tim RainesCard: 1984 FleerMustache Type: Extended PencilFact: Nicknamed “The Rock” based on his solid physique, Raines amassed 808 stolen bases in his 23-year career – the fourth-highest total in MLB history. He was the last player to wear a helmet without at least one ear flap (a rule instituted in 1983) and may be the last player to slide headfirst into second with a bag of cocaine in his hip pocket.

#44: Tim Raines
Card: 1984 Fleer
Mustache Type: Extended Pencil
Fact: Nicknamed “The Rock” based on his solid physique, Raines amassed 808 stolen bases in his 23-year career – the fourth-highest total in MLB history. He was the last player to wear a helmet without at least one ear flap (a rule instituted in 1983) and may be the last player to slide headfirst into second with a bag of cocaine in his hip pocket.

04:01 pm, by pwags1 note

11:43 am, by pwags4 notes


#43: Barry JonesCards: 1988 and 1987 ToppsMustache Type: Dirty Painter’s Brush (with Fu Manchu potential)Fact: Drafted in 1984 by the Pittsburgh Pirates, Jones made his big league debut on July 18, 1986. During his tenure with the team, Jones wore number 50. Yet, on his 1988 Topps card, he’s mysteriously wearing number 69. And on his 1987 Topps card, he’s either trying to score an unassisted triple play or about to complete the daily crossword.Jones played for five teams, retiring in 1994 with a 33 – 33 record and a respectable 3.66 ERA.

#43: Barry Jones
Cards: 1988 and 1987 Topps
Mustache Type: Dirty Painter’s Brush (with Fu Manchu potential)
Fact: Drafted in 1984 by the Pittsburgh Pirates, Jones made his big league debut on July 18, 1986. During his tenure with the team, Jones wore number 50. Yet, on his 1988 Topps card, he’s mysteriously wearing number 69. And on his 1987 Topps card, he’s either trying to score an unassisted triple play or about to complete the daily crossword.

Jones played for five teams, retiring in 1994 with a 33 – 33 record and a respectable 3.66 ERA.

11:42 am, by pwags2 notes




#42: Scott MayCard: 1989 DonrussMustache Type: The BanditFact: Out of all the great mustache aficionados, Scott May unarguably had the most forgettable major league career in history. Selected in the 6th Round of the 1983 Draft, May made his debut in September 1988 with the Texas Rangers, pitching in just three games. His next appearances came in 1991, as a member of the Chicago Cubs, when he pitched in just two games. In total, May compiled a record of 0-0, with a 10.61 ERA.

#42: Scott May
Card: 1989 Donruss
Mustache Type: The Bandit
Fact: Out of all the great mustache aficionados, Scott May unarguably had the most forgettable major league career in history. Selected in the 6th Round of the 1983 Draft, May made his debut in September 1988 with the Texas Rangers, pitching in just three games. His next appearances came in 1991, as a member of the Chicago Cubs, when he pitched in just two games. In total, May compiled a record of 0-0, with a 10.61 ERA.

10:43 am, by pwags1 note


#41: Will ClarkCard: 1989 Cap’n Crunch ToppsMustache Type: Very Heavy Pencil with hint of Fu Manchu Fact: Nicknamed “Will the Thrill,” Will Clark posted a career .303 batting average and earned six All-Star selections. Despite an accomplished career, The Thrill only received 4.4% of votes for the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility, falling short of the required 5% to remain on future ballots. Although he’ll never be a Hall of Famer, he’ll always be rumored to be a descendant of the other William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

#41: Will Clark
Card: 1989 Cap’n Crunch Topps
Mustache Type: Very Heavy Pencil with hint of Fu Manchu
Fact: Nicknamed “Will the Thrill,” Will Clark posted a career .303 batting average and earned six All-Star selections. Despite an accomplished career, The Thrill only received 4.4% of votes for the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility, falling short of the required 5% to remain on future ballots. Although he’ll never be a Hall of Famer, he’ll always be rumored to be a descendant of the other William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

09:25 am, by pwags2 notes




#40: Mike HartCard: 1988 ToppsMustache Type: Major (w/ hint of horseshoe)Fact: Hart was drafted in 1979 by the Seattle Mariners, but didn’t get his big league shot until 1984 with the Minnesota Twins. He later resurfaced for 34 games with the Baltimore Orioles in 1987. In all, he batted a meager .162 in 105 career at-bats. Hart currently works as a middle school gym teacher in Wisconsin.

#40: Mike Hart
Card: 1988 Topps
Mustache Type: Major (w/ hint of horseshoe)
Fact: Hart was drafted in 1979 by the Seattle Mariners, but didn’t get his big league shot until 1984 with the Minnesota Twins. He later resurfaced for 34 games with the Baltimore Orioles in 1987. In all, he batted a meager .162 in 105 career at-bats. Hart currently works as a middle school gym teacher in Wisconsin.

09:50 am, by pwags29 notes




#39: Dick DragoCard: 1978 ToppsMustache Type: Chevron with hint of handlebarFact: During his 13-year career, Drago compiled 108 wins –– 62 of them as complete games. He finished fifth in Cy Young voting in 1971, going 17-11 with a 2.98 ERA for the Royals. In 1976, Drago surrendered Hank Aaron’s 755th career home run –– then and now a major-league record.

#39: Dick Drago
Card: 1978 Topps
Mustache Type: Chevron with hint of handlebar
Fact: During his 13-year career, Drago compiled 108 wins –– 62 of them as complete games. He finished fifth in Cy Young voting in 1971, going 17-11 with a 2.98 ERA for the Royals. In 1976, Drago surrendered Hank Aaron’s 755th career home run –– then and now a major-league record.

12:50 pm, by pwags6 notes